Family Scouting in Cub Scout Packs

This is the second article in our Guide to Family Scouting series. In the previous article we gave an overview of Family Scouting in the Atlanta Area Council.

In this article we will explain the modifications coming to the Cub Scouting program this Fall as a part of Family Scouting.


Cub Scouts go bouldering with their parents

Cub Scouts is a year-round family-and home-centered active program for children in kindergarten through fifth grade, one that encourages learning, friendship, and – most of all – fun!

Cub Scout families join a “Pack” and individual Cubs Scouts are assigned to smaller “Dens,” based on their age.

What is a “Pack”?

A Pack is a group of Cub Scouting families that is chartered to a local church, school or community organization. Packs typically meet monthly, camp together and include Cub Scouts of all ages and their families.

What is a “Den”?

Dens are a group of 6-10 kids, ideally in the same grade.  Dens come together to make up each “Pack”. Dens are separated by gender, either all-girl or all-boy and meet on a more regular basis than Packs.

Different types of Packs

Cub Scout Packs now have three basic membership types:

All-Boy Cub Scout Packs

Cub Scout Packs can operate as all-boy programs with Dens made up of 6-10 boys of the same age.

All-Girl Cub Scout Packs

New this year! Cub Scout Packs can operate as all-girl programs with Dens made up of 6-10 girls of the same age.

In this type of Pack the volunteer leadership must include at least one registered female leader over the age of 21 (male adult leaders can and should be on the team too).

Boy & Girl Cub Scout Packs

New this year! Cub Scout Packs can operate as co-gendered programs with Dens made up of 6-10 girls or boys of the same age and gender.

In a Boy & Girl Cub Scout Pack the Dens may meet separately on all activities or join together for some activities based on the needs and decisions of the Pack leadership and parents.

In this type of Pack the volunteer leadership must include at least one registered female leader over the age of 21 (male adult leaders can and should be on the team too).

Who Decides the Pack’s Structure?

The Chartered Organization will work with the Pack, and Den leaders will decide what is best for their units, including if the Pack is single gender or co-gender. They will also decide if the boy and girl Dens will meet at the same time and place and work on the same activity together.

It is up to the Chartered Organization and the families in your Den and your Pack.  As part of the volunteer leadership team, you can lead your Scouts in the best way for your community.

Packs Undecided About Family Scouting

Your existing Pack may be “undecided” about whether they can incorporate girl Dens or whether they should start an All-Girl Pack. In many cases, that’s because existing leaders have their own commitments to existing boy Dens, don’t know yet where new leaders will come from, but would be thrilled to welcome girls if parents of new families commit to lead Dens and help put on Pack programs.


If you or your Pack are undecided about how to best implement Family Scouting, contact the Family Scouting Committee who will be glad to help you arrive at a solution that works best for you and your community.

The next article in our Guide to Family Scouting will address the transition to Scouts BSA and the formation of new Troops to serve girls ages 11-17.